The Math Learning Center Blog

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We’re excited to inform you registration is open for our 2024 summer events: the Bridges Leadership Institute and the Virtual Leadership Institute. Please join us as we explore ways to expand access, enhance understanding, and cultivate belonging in Bridges classrooms. Visit our website to learn more about our dynamic speakers and venue, and to book your room today .
Mike Wallus, Vice President for Educator Support
We are sad to share the news that our co-founder, Dr. Eugene Maier, passed away earlier this month after a long illness. Gene was a pioneer in developing visual methods for understanding math, and had an unshakeable belief in the ability of each person to find their inner mathematician. Over the span of his distinguished career as a professor, author, and thought leader, Gene had a profound impact...
Rick Ludeman, Chief Executive Officer
The year is coming to an end. Soon your classroom will be quiet. No more pencils, no more books, no more finger counting, no more area models, no more calendar grid markers, no more pattern blocks and geoboard bands and base ten pieces littering the floor. As Sam Keen said, “Deep summer is when laziness finds respectability.” You’ve earned all the relaxation you can get this summer; enjoy it...
Patrick Vennebush, Chief Learning Officer
Attending a Getting Started workshop is a foundational experience for Bridges educators. During the workshop, educators gain familiarity with the components of the curriculum, learn how these components work in the classroom, and investigate ways to use questioning techniques and visual models to differentiate instruction for their students. But how can districts support educators who join a...
Mike Wallus, Vice President for Educator Support
At the Math Learning Center, we believe that all students can make sense of mathematics. Some students just need more time, more opportunities, and more support than others. Our approach emphasizes problem solving, the use of faithful visual models, and a focus on developing fluency. In March 2021, the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) and the What Works Clearinghouse released a new version of...
Nicole Rigelman, Chief Academic Officer
The year is coming to an end. Soon your classroom will be quiet. No more pencils, no more books, no more finger counting, no more area models, no more calendar grid markers, no more pattern blocks and geoboard bands and base ten pieces littering the floor. As Sam Keen said, “Deep summer is when laziness finds respectability.” You’ve earned all the relaxation you can get this summer; enjoy it...
Patrick Vennebush, Chief Learning Officer
At The Math Learning Center, we are committed to supporting elementary mathematics education that builds on the strengths of all students and teachers. We are always seeking to improve our curriculum and professional learning materials to reflect the most current research on equitable and effective teaching and learning. Recently, we’ve focused our efforts on revising Bridges Intervention to align...
Corey Drake, Senior Director for Professional Learning
It’s spring! The sun is shining, plants are growing, and frogs and bugs abound. At The Math Learning Center, we’ve created some fun activities with springtime themes to help get your math blooming! Like February’s popular Share the Math Love celebration, each of the following activities includes the Share Your Work feature. You can send students a link or code to access the activity, and students...
Kim Markworth, Director of Content Development
The 100th day of school is nigh! This point in the school year is significant for its place value importance, but it also indicates that the school year is more than half over. It is an exciting milestone for children, sometimes a relief for teachers, and a reason to celebrate for all. At MLC, the past few months have given us our own reason to celebrate the growing popularity of our free math...
Kim Markworth, Director of Content Development
The hundreds chart is an amazing tool for counting, skip counting, adding, subtracting, multiplying, exploring patterns, investigating place value, problem solving, and more. The standard hundreds chart – with 10 rows of 10 and starting with 1 in the upper left corner – has been used in elementary classrooms for decades to allow for these very opportunities. In more recent years, charts of...
Patrick Vennebush, Chief Learning Officer
Kim Markworth, Director of Content Development