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The Math Learning Center Blog

Patrick Vennebush, Chief Learning Officer & Nicole Rigelman, Chief Academic Officer

As you prepare for the remainder of the school year, we’d like to offer some guidance and suggestions regarding the use of the revised scope and sequence and the tech-enhanced activities.

Scope and Sequence

Knowing that 2020-21 would be a school year unlike any other, we released guidelines for planning to help teachers and districts navigate the uncertainty. Those guidelines include a revised scope and sequence for a year during which instructional time would likely be compromised

Vi Tamargo, Curriculum Developer, Professional Learning

In this series of blog posts, we highlight educators in the field who are using remote learning resources intentionally to build classroom community, collaboration, and student sense-making.

In a recent post, Ed Tech Specialist Tod Johnston discusses how educators can leverage digital tools to position students as active partners in their learning. Digital tools are a necessity during this time of remote learning, yet those we offer—and how we offer

Vi Tamargo, Curriculum Developer, Professional Learning

In this series of blog posts, we highlight educators in the field who are using remote learning resources intentionally to build classroom community, collaboration, and student sense-making.

This year, Bridges educators are adapting instruction to unique situations and varied circumstances. While some Bridges educators are teaching in person (with safety protocols in place) or 100% remotely, many are teaching in mixed, hybrid situations. In these settings, some students attend class in person while others join in “live” using Zoom or Google Meet. In

Mike Wallus, Director of Educator Support

This week, registration opened for MLC’s January grade-level support webinars. As with past webinars in this series, our curriculum consultants and teachers in residence will explore resources and offer guidance for how they may be used to support students in synchronous and asynchronous settings. January’s webinars will focus on unpacking the mathematics in the upcoming unit, examining questioning strategies, and using share codes to design and scaffold learning activities. The grade-level support webinars will devote 50 minutes to the upcoming unit and 10 minutes to addressing

Vi Tamargo, Curriculum Developer, Professional Learning

In this series of blog posts, we highlight educators in the field who are using remote learning resources intentionally to build classroom community, collaboration, and student sense-making.

Bridges educators strive to develop safe learning environments that foster inclusivity and collaboration. This environment creates a space for students to develop a sense of belonging and engage in learning with their teacher and peers. But in a remote environment—especially one with limited synchronous time—how do educators develop a sense of classroom community

Mike Wallus, Director of Educator Support

Embedded below are the replays for the Unit 3 (Part B) grade-level webinars, which continued exploring the unit content, corresponding Tech-Enhanced Activities,  Math at Home   resources and Digital Work Places. 

As with the Unit 2 webinar  and Unit 3 (Part A) replays we’re including the replays for each grade level below on a single page to facilitate sharing with your peers.  

Since we cover resources created to support Bridges educators during the 2020–21 school year, you may find the definitions and links on this reference document  helpful.

Please watch and share.

Vi Tamargo, Curriculum Developer, Professional Learning

Editor's note: In this series of blog posts, we highlight educators in the field who are using remote learning resources intentionally to build classroom community, collaboration, and student sense-making.

Educators share with us that one of the aspects of the Bridges classroom they miss the most this year is their turn-and-talk routine. Teachers wish they could hear the voices of their students sharing their thinking, and many students wish they had the opportunity to process their thinking before discussion with the larger group

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